MN Disaggregation Of Ethnic Data

Production Editor Needed

By Rick King and Chang Wang, contributors

Editor’s Note:  Both Rick King and Chang Wang consider themselves lucky, and the luckiness is generational.  King, a “baby boomer” who was born in California and grew up in Massachusetts, believes overall, his generation is better off than his parents’ and his children’s; Wang, originally from Beijing, belongs to “Generation ’89” in China, even believes his generation is the luckiest in Chinese history since 1842. 

China Insight invites King and Wang to author a conversational style essay to compare the lives and the key characteristics of the “baby boomers” in the U.S. and the “Generation ’89” in China. 

The first of this four-part series defines who the boomer and Generation ’89 are in the U.S. and China respectively.   The subsequent parts will describe, contrast and compare the various economic and societal factors that affect and shape the two groups in their respective countries.

By Elaine Dunn

The local Chinese community under the direction and organization of the Minnesota Chinese Association (MCA) joined in a nationwide rally that took place on Feb. 20 in more than 40 other major U.S. cities in support of ex-NYPD Officer Peter Liang.  Liang was found guilty on Feb. 11 of second-degree manslaughter of Akai Gurley, a young, unarmed black male.  Nationwide rallies drew more than 1,000,000 participants and took place in Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Raleigh, San Francisco, and Washington D.C. amongst others.  

The Minnesota rally took place at Saint Paul’s State Capitol Lower Mall.  Approximately 300 demonstrators, mostly Chinese Americans, waved American flags and carried a variety of signs that proclaimed “Justice for Liang, Justice for All!” “Justice-Yes, Politics No,” “No Scapegoat!” “Tragedy Not Crime!” "One Tragedy Two Victims.”  The local rally participants also signed a petition that will be sent to Brooklyn Judge Danny Chun, a fellow Asian American whom some in the Asian communities felt may “feel compelled to levy a harsh sentence so he can’t be accused of being soft on another Asian.”  

By Rick King and Chang Wang, contributors

Editor’s Note:  Both Rick King and Chang Wang consider themselves lucky, and the luckiness is generational.  King, a “baby boomer” who was born in California and grew up in Massachusetts, believes overall, his generation is better off than his parents’ and his children’s; Wang, originally from Beijing, belongs to “Generation ’89” in China, even believes his generation is the luckiest in Chinese history since 1842. 

China Insight invites King and Wang to author a conversational style essay to compare the lives and the key characteristics of the “baby boomers” in the U.S. and the “Generation ’89” in China. 

In this last installment, King and Wang will describe and compare how healthcare, values and growing global citizenship affect the two groups and how the systems work in their respective countries.  Who were their cultural icons and was there any overlap?  

By Rick King and Chang Wang, contributors

Editor’s Note:  Both Rick King and Chang Wang consider themselves lucky, and the luckiness is generational.  King, a “baby boomer” who was born in California and grew up in Massachusetts, believes overall, his generation is better off than his parents’ and his children’s; Wang, originally from Beijing, belongs to “Generation ’89” in China, even believes his generation is the luckiest in Chinese history since 1842. 

China Insight invites King and Wang to author a conversational style essay to compare the lives and the key characteristics of the “baby boomers” in the U.S. and the “Generation ’89” in China. 

Last month, King and Wang defined who qualified as the boomers and Generation’89-ers and described some of the societal and economic circumstances surrounding their formative years.  The rest of this series will provide details of, compare, and contrast the various factors that affect and influence the well-being of the “luckiest” generations and the generations that came before and after them. 

Terms Of Use

Terms of Use All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without prior written permission of the publisher. For permission requests, contact [email protected] with subject line “Permission request.”

About

CHINAINSIGHT (CI) is published monthly ((except July/August and November/December are combined) by China Insight, Inc., an independent, privately owned company started in 2001 and headquartered in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.

CHINAINSIGHT is the only English-language American newspaper to focus exclusively on connections between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Our goal is to develop a mutual understanding of each other’s cultures and business environments and to foster U.S.-China cultural and business harmony.