By Elaine Dunn

“It is my dearest wish that young people… see life according to the facts as they are, that they will face these facts, and that they will not be deceived by ideals that are meant to deceive or even control them.”  Elsie Elliott   June 2, 1913 – Dec. 8, 2015

The 1960s were turbulent times.  Protests and demonstrations abound around the world.  The decade of transformation saw women emerge as leaders fighting for cultural changes such as equal pay for equal work, and calling for an end to domestic violence and gender disparities. 

In the U.S., Gloria Steinem burned the bra for Women’s Rights.  Angela Davis was front and center in the Black Panther Party.  Across the pond, Bernadette Devlin was the fiery Irish socialist and the youngest person (she was 21) to be elected to UK’s Parliament … to name a few.

And in Hong Kong, there was Elsie Elliott.

To younger readers, you’re probably going, “Who?”  To older folks like me, she was a force to be reckoned with in Hong Kong for half a century!

By Chang Wang and Robert Webber, contributors

 

The Minnesota State Bar Association (MSBA) Section of Immigration Law recently hosted the Second Annual “Immigrant Attorneys Among Us - Successes and Challenges of Our Colleagues Who Were Born Outside the U.S.,” a panel discussion and a continuing legal education program .  Chang Wang, regular China Insight contributor, is a member of the Immigration Council at MSBA and served as a panelist at the program.  The panel was moderated by Robert Webber, chair of MSBA Section of Immigration Law.  Following is Webber’s conversation with Wang about his career at Thomson Reuters and in immigration law.  

By Chang Wang and Robert Webber, contributors

The Minnesota State Bar Association (MSBA) Section of Immigration Law recently hosted the Second Annual “Immigrant Attorneys Among Us - Successes and Challenges of Our Colleagues Who Were Born Outside the U.S.,” a panel discussion and a continuing legal education program .  Chang Wang, regular China Insight contributor, is a member of the Immigration Council at MSBA and served as a panelist at the program.  The panel was moderated by Robert Webber, chair of MSBA Section of Immigration Law.  Following is Webber’s conversation with Wang About his journey from Chinese graduate student to passing his Minnesota bar exam.  Wang will continue his conversation about his career at Thomson Reuters and in immigration law with Webber next month.

By Carolyn Kuhn, Gene Chan and Bill Chen

Editor’s note:  May 7, 1843, marks the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States and May 10, 1869, marks the completion of the transcontinental railroad where the majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants.  In 1990, former President George H.W. Bush signed a bill to extend Asian-American Heritage Week to a month-long commemoration of Asian American contributions.

Introduction

The first major contribution by Chinese Americans in the United States was the building of the transcontinental railroads – the Central and Pacific Railroads linking east and west, resulting in economic development, commerce, passenger travel and tourism.  But full recognition of the role of the pioneering Chinese railroad workers has been a slow process.  The May 2014 induction of Chinese Railroad Workers in the Department of Labor’s Hall of Honor was a significant but long overdue step toward recognition of their accomplishments, which entailed hard labor and skilled work, with corresponding high risk of life.

Launched in 2012, Stanford University’s Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project constitutes a comprehensive research and collection effort to detail who the workers were, how they lived and how their experiences changed their lives.  The project involves an interdisciplinary, transnational effort that will result in an online multilingual digital archive. 

Upon the submission of input to the Stanford project by one of the authors, a serendipity finding surfaced – there were two other descendants who served in World War II in China in the 14th Air Force (Flying Tigers) under the legendary General Claire L. Chennault.  All three served as officers; two in the U.S. Army Air Corps and one in the Chinese Air Force.  Two were pilots: one a Hump pilot in the U.S. Army Air Corps, one a P-40 and P-51 fighter pilot in the Chinese Air Force.  

By Greg Hugh

The dreams of several basketball legends recently came true when the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame announced its class for 2016.  Unlike Cooperstown or Canton, the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass. is not linked specifically with the American pro league.  It also honors international players, amateurs, women, coaches, contributors and referees.  The criteria for admittance to the hoops hall is less focused on American professional on-court performance.  

In 2002, Yao Ming went from the basketball courts in his native China (where he had already played five seasons of basketball) to being a first overall pick in the NBA Draft.   

However, the NBA had never seen a player like Yao Ming.  Not only is he 7'6" tall, he is Chinese.

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About

CHINAINSIGHT (CI) is published monthly ((except July/August and November/December are combined) by China Insight, Inc., an independent, privately owned company started in 2001 and headquartered in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.

CHINAINSIGHT is the only English-language American newspaper to focus exclusively on connections between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Our goal is to develop a mutual understanding of each other’s cultures and business environments and to foster U.S.-China cultural and business harmony.