wellsfargo

northwestern health sciences

Production Editor Needed

By Stephanie He

Many international students have work experience when they study in school. It is good experience for getting a good job after graduating. For the international students, this is the most important point to get a formal job in the United States. Some students have an internship in school; other students have a part-time job during their studies. Not only they can get work experience, but they also can earn some money to decrease the financial burden on their parents. In the competitive school environment, getting a part-time job on campus is rare for international students.

One-of-a-kind program aims to become national model

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (December 2010) — Numerous mentoring programs around the country regularly match businesses with kids. The varied programs are critically important and often show positive results. But few, if any, of these initiatives involve the head of the company in a year-long effort to broaden the horizons of at-risk students through the world of business. In an ambitious effort to prepare vulnerable children for rewarding careers in the future, Risen Christ School (RCS), a 325-student, K-8 grade school located in the Powderhorn Park area of Minneapolis, has created an innovative program, Imagine the Possibilities.

Most Americans know that Chinese companies have become major players in the worldwide economy. The corporate world, however, isn't the only area in which China's ambition and global interest are making waves — a recent report revealed that China is now the number one source for international students studying in the United States. And with 29 million students enrolled in higher education in China, the opportunities for international collaboration will likely only grow.

Kila Panchot and Ana Ford attended Minhua-MCA Chinese Camp for a week this summer and agreed to share their experiences with ChinaInsight. The two friends are sixth graders at Name of Charter School. They are both Chinese American adoptees.

By Vivian Mui

As the plane tipped towards the bright July sun, I felt my body sink into the seat and I leaned over my shoulder to look out the thick plastic window. The familiar landscape of a green and brown grid spread across the horizon and I desperately searched for any landmarks.

Subcategories

Terms Of Use

Terms of Use All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without prior written permission of the publisher. For permission requests, contact [email protected] with subject line “Permission request.”

About

CHINAINSIGHT (CI) is published monthly ((except July/August and November/December are combined) by China Insight, Inc., an independent, privately owned company started in 2001 and headquartered in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.

CHINAINSIGHT is the only English-language American newspaper to focus exclusively on connections between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Our goal is to develop a mutual understanding of each other’s cultures and business environments and to foster U.S.-China cultural and business harmony.