With advertisements in 13 Asian languages and promotional materials in many more, the Census Bureau [Mar. 11] provided an overview of the historic campaign it is conducting to encourage all members of the Asian community to fill out and mail back their 2010 Census forms. With advertisements in 13 Asian languages and promotional materials in many more, the Census Bureau [Mar. 11] provided an overview of the historic campaign it is conducting to encourage all members of the Asian community to fill out and mail back their 2010 Census forms.
 
“The Census Bureau’s Asian campaign is historic and multifaceted,” said Paul Watanabe, a member of the Census Bureau’s Asian Advisory Committee. “Not only are there more materials available in more Asian languages than in any previous census, but all materials are created in consultation with relevant Asian community leaders to ensure cultural and language relevancy.”
 
Outreach efforts targeting the Asian community include the following: 
*       Advertisements in 13 Asian languages, including 24 television spots, 62 radio spots and 46 print advertisements. This is first known advertising campaign to produce such a wide range of customized, targeted, in-language advertisements featuring actors from each Asian community.
*       Staff from a wide range of Asian cultures who speak the language and understand their community’s unique concerns.
*       Partnerships with local Asian community organizations, such as the Asian American Justice Center (AAJC) in Washington, D.C. and the Korean Churches for Community Development (KCCD) in Los Angeles.
*       Asian media briefings in key cities to provide an overview of the 2010 Census and updates on regional activities related to the 2010 Census.
*       A confidentiality campaign, designed to educate communities that the census is safe and that all data collected will be kept completely confidential.
*       ‘Portrait of America’ Road Tour participation in different Asian parades, festivals and community events, such as the Chinese New Year Parade and Festival in San Francisco.
 
The official 2010 Census form is available in six languages, including simplified Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese. Language assistance guides, intended to help Asian community members fill out their census questionnaires, are available in a total of 59 languages, including Chinese (traditional), Japanese, Laotian, Thai, Khmer/Cambodian, Hmong, Burmese, Nepali, Gujarati, Malayalam, Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi, Tamil, Bengali and Telugu. More than 30,000 questionnaire assistance centers throughout the country, including many in Asian communities, will help members of the public fill in their forms, and toll-free in-language lines will be made available to the public. 
 
“It is vital that all Asians in the U.S. participate in the Census so that our voices can be heard,” Watanabe said. “Filling out and mailing back your 2010 Census form is one of the most important things we can do as a community. The questions on the form are basic, your responses are strictly confidential, and the data the census produces will help determine congressional representation and how more than US$400 billion in federal dollars are distributed to communities every year.”
 
For more information about the 2010 Census, please visit www.2010census.gov.

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