AmCham Shanghai and the U.S.-China Business Council were pleased to host United States Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke at a breakfast event on July 17 at the Portman Ritz Carlton Hotel. Secretary Locke’s four-day trip to China, alongside U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, was focused on engaging Chinese officials on the global economy, discussing ways both countries can respond to the issue of climate change and promoting U.S. green technology companies.

Project will serve up to three million blind or visually impaired people in China

Minnesota State Services for the Blind’s (SSB) Radio Talking Book (RTB) is helping China establish its own radio reading service that will serve as many as three million blind or visually impaired persons in that country.

Send e-mails in Chinese without knowing the language – ChinglishMail.com launched August 3, 2009 

CULEMBORG, Netherlands (U.S. Asian Wire) -- August 3, 2009 --- A new email application allows users to write an email message in English and then forward it with Chinese and English text side-by-side. This solves the language barrier with China and sets a new standard in e-mail communication.

On July 17, the ceremonial groundbreaking at the sight of the USA Pavilion for the World Expo in Shanghai, China in 2010 took place.  This is another step forward in the journey to the first-ever World Expo held in China.

China’s economy has continued to feel the brunt of the global crisis. Global economic activity continued to decline in the first part of 2009, even as tentative signs of stabilization have emerged recently in several countries.

However, very expansionary fiscal and monetary policies have kept the economy growing respectably. Fiscal stimulus is centered on the infrastructure-oriented “RMB 4 trillion” stimulus plan and the monetary stimulus has led to a surge in new bank lending. Government-influenced investment has soared. Market-based investment has lagged, although positive signs have emerged in the real estate sector. Consumption has held up well. Very weak exports have continued to be the main drag on growth, but import volumes have recovered in the second quarter of 2009 as raw material imports rebounded.

By Greg Hugh, Staff Writer 

The topic for the June meeting of U.S.-China Business Connections (UCBC), Alternatives to Building a Plant in China, was presented by a panel of speakers that included Chris Berghoff of Control Products, Steve Oanes of Stuhr Associates, and Dale Peterson of MINNCOR Industries.

Each of the speakers presented a different perspective as how to approach building a plant in China and suggested their alternatives.

There obviously was much interest in the above topic that was presented at the May meeting of U.S.-China Business Connections (UCBC). The meeting was moved to a larger room at the Minneapolis Community and Technical College which attracted more than 90 participants, the largest crowd to attend a regular UCBC monthly meeting.

By China Today Staff Reporter Liu Qiong

One of the most important lessons drawn from the financial crisis is that we must change the economic growth mode from one reliant on exports to one reliant on domestic demand.

The global financial crisis has exerted pressure on exports and employment, and has influenced Chinese people's income level and will to consume. To increase domestic demand, some local governments have tried to stimulate consumption through issuing consumption coupons.

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CHINAINSIGHT (CI) is published monthly ((except July/August and November/December are combined) by China Insight, Inc., an independent, privately owned company started in 2001 and headquartered in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.

CHINAINSIGHT is the only English-language American newspaper to focus exclusively on connections between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Our goal is to develop a mutual understanding of each other’s cultures and business environments and to foster U.S.-China cultural and business harmony.