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By Anthony James, Staff Writer

You could say that Andrew Moy is your average middleschooler. He likes computers, video games, and learning magic tricks. What you didn't know, but would probably find out if you talked to him, is that he has landed roles across the Twin Cities theatre scene and aspires to eventually become a game show host.

 By Anthony James, Staff Writer

You could say that Andrew Moy is your average middleschooler. He likes computers, video games, and learning magic tricks. What you didn't know, but would probably find out if you talked to him, is that he has landed roles across the Twin Cities theatre scene and aspires to eventually become a game show host.

AndrewMoy2

Andrew Moy performing magic tricks recently at A Passage to China at Mall of America

At only 12 years old, Andrew has performed in the Guthrie's "Christmas Carol", understudied with the Children's Theatre, and is currently a part of the cast of "Jesus Christ Super Star" at the Chanhassen Dinner Theatre that runs until July. I was able to catch up Andrew as he displayed his magic skills at the A Passage to China event in the Mall of America. In our conversation, he talked about how all of his performances are just a stepping stone to a career mirroring Pat Sajak, Bob Barker, and Alex Trebek. Even after we talked, I noticed how much time he spent working on his goal when he demonstrated off his magic tricks.

His small stature and youthful presence was deceiving: I grew embarrassed while he fumbled an overhand shuffle of his cards only to have him masterfully pull off a challenging trick right before my eyes. Performing magic is not new to Andrew. When he was in 2nd grade he started using a Scholastic magic kit and immediately caught on. In a year he was showing off his talents for Boy Scout meetings and graduation parties. Teenagers and even fellow magicians were impressed that such a young kid could learn the tricks so quickly. It wasn't long before his parents knew that he was destined to entertain.

Even by 6th grade Andrew's acting path has had its bumps and even bruises. His first audition for his 4th grade play "West Side Story" did not land him a part, but his teachers urged him to keep auditioning. When he landed much larger parts, his experiences were far from injury free. While with the Guthrie's "Christmas Carol", Andrew sprained his ankle four times and while performing "Baseball Saved Us" at Mixed Blood Theatre he got a nosebleed. 

But through the tough times Andrew has kept going. Even on his off days there always seems to be performing on Andrew's mind. In the car he often plays improvisational games with his mother and constantly works on his magic tricks when he is not going to school. As he wants to be a game show host when he is older, he often makes slideshow games modeled after "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?". Not only is he working on magic and acting, he takes voice lessons, just learned film editing at school, and is aspiring to work on his dancing technique. In all, it doesn't quite matter to Andrew what he is doing, but rather that he is able make a pleasant experience for his audience. "I like people to have fun...I like to entertain."

Whether behind the camera or on the stage, watch out for Andrew Moy; you might see him soon enough.

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About

CHINAINSIGHT (CI) is published monthly ((except July/August and November/December are combined) by China Insight, Inc., an independent, privately owned company started in 2001 and headquartered in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.

CHINAINSIGHT is the only English-language American newspaper to focus exclusively on connections between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Our goal is to develop a mutual understanding of each other’s cultures and business environments and to foster U.S.-China cultural and business harmony.