Pronouncements(March 2021)
March 1 2021
by Gregory J. Hugh, Publisher – CEO, China Insight, Inc.
With a handful of snowstorms travelling through the country over the past few weeks, it may not feel like spring is coming anytime soon. But as we enter the month of March, the spring equinox isn't too far behind. According to the Old Farmer's Almanac, spring equinox in 2021 falls on Sat., March 20, at 5:37 a.m. This will mark the astronomical first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere.
Asian American Unity Coalition (AAUC)
March 1 2021 According to the Asian American Unity Coalition (AAUC) Preamble: Asian Americans shall either win equal citizenship UNITED or suffer discrimination separately. To aspire to live as equals in a free market system like the U.S.A. where we represent one of the smallest minorities, we must UNITE to acquire sufficient strength to fight off discrimination
committee100Study_202103
March 1 2021
[NEW YORK, Feb. 8, 2021]
– Committee of 100 (C100), the nonprofit leadership organization of Chinese Americans in business, government, academia, healthcare, and the arts announced a landmark study on the historic contributions of Chinese Americans to the fabric of American society.
2 Physicists 202103
March 1 2021
by Elaine Dunn.
March 8 is International Women’s Day. Since 1911, women the world over have been honored for their achievements, be it in the cultural, economic, educational, historical, political or social fields on this day. March 8 is also a day for women from all backgrounds to come together to break down barriers for gender parity and women’s rights.
Bergad
family 202103
March 1 2021
This article by Sarah Lemagie, reprinted with permission from the Minneapolis Foundation, first appeared in the foundation’s website on Dec.7, 2020.
When the pandemic struck Minnesota this spring, Pearl Bergad reached out to her two sons and their wives: We’ve built up a pretty substantial reserve in our Donor Advised Fund at the Minneapolis Foundation, she pointed out. Let’s do something with it now.
Book Review 202103
March 1 2021
Reviewed by J.D. Mabbot, contributor
Niklas Hageback’s “The Downfall of China or CCP 3.0?” is an insightful look at inside the policies of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) that will decide whether it will face an impending downfall, or yet again can manage to transform itself radically and weather the storm.
CNY Photos 202103
March 1 2021
by China Insight
View the wonderful photos from local Chinese New Year Celebrations.
Publisher’s Pronouncements (Feb 2021)
January 30 2021
by Gregory J. Hugh, Publisher – CEO, China Insight, Inc.
Now that Joseph R. Biden has been inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States, the country needs to unite again after experiencing a tumultuous period under the previous administration leading to a tragic demonstration at the nation’s capital on Jan. 6.
Garden fundraising
30 January 2021
By William Zajicek, contributor.
The St. Paul-Changsha China Friendship Garden, located in Phalen Park, Saint Paul, is seeking additional funds ($160,000) to complete Phase I of the garden construction and begin Phase II.
CNY do’s and don’ts
30 January 2021
By Elaine Dunn, China Insight.
Feb. 12 will be start of the Year of the Ox, which, according to Chinese tradition, is a symbol for wealth. So … here are a few tips on how to ring the year in the Chinese way.
App deadline for CGM
30 January 2021
by Elaine Dunn, China Insight.
The Chinese American WWII Veterans Recognition Project enters its fifth year with great anticipation for the award ceremony of the Congressional Gold Medal to more than 3,000 veterans who have applied for, and confirmed for this honor.
local national speedskating champion
30 January 2021
by Elaine Dunn, China Insight.
Whether the 2022 Winter Olympics will take place as planned in Beijing or not (China Insight, January 2021) is anyone’s guess at this point, but to the many hopeful participants, their training and laser-sharp focus are on getting to one of the three medal-winning podiums in their event in whatever city it may take place.
CGM
January 3, 2021
By Greg Hugh.
It has been a long and uncertain journey, but Chinese American veterans who served their country in World War II were finally awarded the Congressional Gold Medal on Dec. 9, 2020.
Efforts to enact the Congressional Gold Medal Act for these Chinese American veterans first began in December 2016. An exploratory committee led by the Chinese American Citizens Alliance (CACA) set out to secure the support of members of Congress. The bill, first introduced to the Senate and the House of Representatives in May 2017, was ultimately passed on and signed by President Donald Trump Dec. 20, 2018.
NY Chinatown images
December 31, 2020
by China Insight.
While air travel is still risky health-wise and lockdowns are common, here is a chance for us to “travel” and see New York City’s Chinatown.
The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) and the Center for Jewish History (CJH) are co-hosting a new online exhibition, “An Unlikely Photojournalist: Emile Bocian in Chinatown,” at https://exhibits.cjh.org/bocian.
Beijing 2020 Olympics
December 31, 2020
by Elaine Dunn, China Insight.
The 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing opened with great fanfare. It was China’s debut on the world stage, an opportunity to showcase its history, culture and its athletes to a global audience. Fast forward to the 2022 Winter Olympics. Once again, Beijing will be the venue. However, circumstances are quite different.
2021 Chinese Holidays
December 31, 2020
Compiled by China Insight.
China’s 2021 holiday schedule will, per tradition, include two week-long holidays: Chinese New Year, aka Spring Festival, which will take place Feb. 11-17; and the National Day Holiday, Oct. 1-7.
Society Fat Size
December 31, 2020
compiled by China Insight.
On Nov. 11, a netizen posted an image of an apparel size chart seen at a Taiwanese chain store in China, saying, “I was shocked when I saw this size chart at a RT-Mart today. Am I completely rotten?” That image and post went viral and it enraged the online community, causing the company’s China Division to issue a public apology the following day.
Garden202011
November 2020
by Bill Zajicek, president, Minnesota China Friendship Garden Society.

There were two large volunteer projects at the garden this summer/fall. As a result, the rock garden was completely weeded and mulched; the donor stanchion received a new coat of paint, the Hmong Heritage Wall was painted, and as a gift from the Minnesota Peony Society, nine peonies were planted: three each of herbaceous “Krinkled White,” herbaceous “America Red” and tree peonies (Fuji-Zome-Goromo, Renkaku, Tai Hai)!!!
HKU
November 2020
By Elaine Dunn

The Hong Kong University (HKU) appointed two mainland Chinese scholars to its governing council, one of whom is alleged to have direct ties to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).
Book Review 202011
November 2020
By China Insight

You may notice the more-than-usual number of books included this issue. With Christmas giving around the corner and the snowy winter approaching, China Insight thought these titles may provide gift ideas or just material for a “good read” in front of the fireplace.
Enjoy!
GoodJob_Deed
November 2020
[ST. PAUL]
– Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) Commissioner Steve Grove announced the #GoodJobsNow campaign with Rick Trontvet from Marvin Windows in Warroad and Traci Tapani from Wyoming Machine in Stacy.

On April 4 and 5, the Chinese Heritage Foundation, in collaboration with ChinaInsight, presented the second annual A Passage to China, an interactive journey, at the Mall of America in Bloomington. With 40 Chinese community and local organizations, together with a New York-based bookseller, participating, preparations leading up to the two-day event were intense. The arrivals, from China, of 4 life-sized terra cotta warriors and 10 custom-made 6-foot tall lanterns increased the excitement. Long after the Mall had closed on April 3, a team of volunteers worked hard to uncrate and move the warriors in place, while another team hung the lanterns, numerous large silk kites, and the two newly commissioned bamboo and silk entrance gates. A specially constructed bamboo butterfly arbor provided the last touch in transforming the huge, impersonal space of the Best Buy® Rotunda into a congenial and welcoming Chinese landscape of human proportions. On April 4 and 5, the Chinese Heritage Foundation, in collaboration with ChinaInsight, presented the second annual A Passage to China, an interactive journey, at the Mall of America in Bloomington. With 40 Chinese community and local organizations, together with a New York-based bookseller, participating, preparations leading up to the two-day event were intense. The arrivals, from China, of 4 life-sized terra cotta warriors and 10 custom-made 6-foot tall lanterns increased the excitement. Long after the Mall had closed on April 3, a team of volunteers worked hard to uncrate and move the warriors in place, while another team hung the lanterns, numerous large silk kites, and the two newly commissioned bamboo and silk entrance gates. A specially constructed bamboo butterfly arbor provided the last touch in transforming the huge, impersonal space of the Best Buy® Rotunda into a congenial and welcoming Chinese landscape of human proportions.

This free event, staged at Mall of America to attract an audience that would not normally attend Chinese events, generated much publicity among local media, press and television, as well as magazines. Lines were forming before the event officially opened at 11 a.m. on both Saturday and Sunday, and the crowds stayed long past the closing hour at 5 p.m.

Amid the hum, some might say roar, of bustling activities for children at various tables, many adults were engaged in earnest conversations with colleges and universities that offer Chinese Studies programs. A quiet painter demonstrating the ethereal and spare art of bamboo painting was miles (it seemed that way as one navigated slowly through the throngs of attendees) away from the robust and colorful paintings of a peasant painter from China. A joyous child, dancing with her newly made Mongolian harmonica, whirled past a serious Caucasian American intent on his game of go with his Chinese host. A serious-minded Chinese scholar pondered the life-long implications of the Chinese name he was about to bestow upon the eager Scandinavian child in front of him, while his neighbor, the fortune teller, raced to put a positive spin on a fortune josh stick that spelled anything but fortune to the child’s mother.

A smiling and obviously proud Chinese elderly lady strolled the lanes in the Rotunda, leaning on her cane.  Approval shone in her eyes as she watched children entranced in the making of Chinese lanterns, opera masks and pop-up butterflies. She warmly greeted relatives and friends from out-of-town who had traveled, expressly at her urging, to attend this gathering.  This scene was played out over and over as other Chinese seniors greeted their long-time friends whom, due to increasing age and frailty, they no longer saw frequently.  Many also had come with their grandchildren, eager for the opportunity to show the new generation a sliver of their ancestral culture that they had held so close to their hearts.

The desire to mentor the next generation was evident among many professional artists who performed in Sears Court on Sunday.  They chose to forgo the opportunity of performing solo and opted instead to share the stage with their protégés. As the audience, literally filled to the rafters, looked on, the Mongolian dance teacher danced off-stage in leading her young charges on-stage through an intricate series of turns and tumbles, renowned cellist Yali You performed with student Michael Wu, guzheng expert Li Jiaxiang with pupils Jarrelle Barton and Lisa Veronneau, and pipa virtuoso Gao Hong with her Carleton College Chinese Music Ensemble.

No Chinese event is complete without a lion dance. The Minnesota International Lion Dance Association lives up to its name, counting among its troupe Caucasian and African Americans as well as Chinese Americans. Their dance through the center aisle of the Rotunda and their charming individualized greetings brought giggles to young and old alike. Tai chi, tea ceremony and cooking demonstrations completed the Chinese experience.

A 10-foot-tall bamboo arbor stood quietly behind the head tables, displaying creative and colorful butterflies submitted by school children from throughout the Twin Cities. Flanked by two life-sized terra cotta warriors, the arbor celebrated the age-old Chinese absorption with butterflies, a symbol of true love as immortalized by the tragic story of the Butterfly Lovers, Liang Shanbo and Zhu Yingtai.

In forming a public/private partnership to produce this event, Chinese Heritage Foundation and ChinaInsight have taken a small step forward in the goals spelled out in the two entrance gates: mutual understanding and mutual courtesy among all peoples around the world. They were aided in this quest by Mall of America, a model corporate citizen, who put its considerable resources at their disposal. They were also blessed with an army of volunteers who devoted hundreds of hours to bring about this entirely volunteer-produced event. A Passage to China, a metaphorical journey into understanding one’s self and one’s place in the world will continue to strive to enchant and illuminate Chinese culture, history and geography in an increasingly interwoven world.


Schools that participated in the Butterfly Project:

Xin Xing Academy of Hopkins (6 strands)
Girl Scout Troop of Hopkins (1 strand)
St. Agnes School of St. Paul (2 strands)
Yinghua Academy of St., Paul (5 poster boards)
Lakes International Language Academy of Forest Lake (11 strands)

Terms Of Use

Terms of Use All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without prior written permission of the publisher. For permission requests, contact the publisher, Terms of Use All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without prior written permission of the publisher. For permission requests, contact [email protected] with subject line “Permission request.”

About

CHINAINSIGHT (CI) is published monthly ((except July/August and November/December are combined) by China Insight, Inc., an independent, privately owned company started in 2001 and headquartered in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.

CHINAINSIGHT is the only English-language American newspaper to focus exclusively on connections between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Our goal is to develop a mutual understanding of each other’s cultures and business environments and to foster U.S.-China cultural and business harmony.