By Anthony James, Staff Writer

I leaned against the wall in the dorm hallway. It was back in my college days, and I was spending time between classes expounding on light topics with a few fellow students. It is not important that these particular friends were white, but where the conversation headed it became relevant. The discussion topic was a local Asian eatery. One of the students joked that even though he had never been there, you'd "better not bring [your cat] near there 'cause they'll steal it and eat it." I don't quite remember how I replied, but I remember not confronting them on the offensiveness of their comments. As with comments I've heard from others, pressing some sort of political correctness wasn't worth my time. These particular students would never think of themselves as racist or insensitive. We had a common friend who was Vietnamese American, but you would never hear them say what I heard in front of him. Needless, I didn't communicate with either classmate much after that event, and as far as I know, neither knew that I am biracial, born part Chinese and part Norwegian-American.

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The path to power in China is still dominated by revolutionary political divisions

Op-Ed Commentary: Chris Devonshire-Ellis

May 2 – Recent events in China, ranging from the jostling of power for seats on the Central Commission for the CCP, the downfall of Bo Xilai, and the recent escape of activist Chen Guangcheng from house detention in Shandong have all displayed to varying degrees the changing faces of China’s evolution. In fact, in over 20 years in China I have never personally seen anything quite like the vying for influence being acted out in today’s contemporary political scene. The fact that they are observable at all says perhaps rather more for certain factions that are involved in the path for reform than the oft-lauded “freedom via internet” that many believe is behind an unprecedented media coverage of the struggles and power plays currently underway.

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