By Anthony James 

Although it is one of the world’s largest producers of food, China is in a pickle: the country is running out of farmland. That's pretty surprising for a country that feeds close to 20 percent of the world’s population and employs more than 300 million farmers. However, with rapid industrialization, mass migrations of farmers to the cities, and the growing demand for food by its middle class, how is China going to get more food?

By Jens Petersen

China’s foreign exchange policy and capital controls have been highly controversial
over the last decade. Whether the discussion centers on the apparent undervaluation of
the Renminbi (RMB) or the stringent control of currency flowing in and out of China, it
seems quite certain that these issues will continue to receive considerable attention in the
foreseeable future.

By  Brenda Fong, Wells Fargo Branch Manager

Far from the frugality and conservation that prevailed during the Great Depression, kids these days focus on spending, spending and more spending!  Even parents who aim to teach their children about finances through an allowance may find their lessons overshadowed by stronger messages from advertising or peers.  Unfortunately, the result is that by the time they graduate from high school, most young people know all about spending and very little about saving or spending wisely.

New research report calls for a shift of China’s development and growth model

BEIJING February 27, 2012 - China should complete its transition to a market economy -- through enterprise, land, labor, and financial sector reforms -- strengthen its private sector, open its markets to greater competition and innovation, and ensure equality of opportunity to help achieve its goal of a new structure for economic growth.

Labor cost evaluations the huge bugbear in planning for 2012

Posted on October 24, 2011 by China Briefing

Op-Ed Commentary by Chris Devonshire-Ellis

Oct. 24 – One of the main problems facing businesses in China today remains the uncertainty factor. Getting that out of China's commercial creed is proving a tough nut to crack, and before he upped sticks from Beijing to become a U.S. Presidential candidate, Jon Huntsman reiterated the same to me a year ago at the Economist China Conference.

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